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    Bagpipes: A National Collection of a National Treasure

    £14.99
    Based on 'a national collection of a national instrument' in National Museums Scotland, the book puts the musicology of the bagpipe in its European context. There is no CD-ROM with this edition.
    ISBN: 9781905267552
    AuthorHugh Cheape
    Pub Date06/01/2011
    BindingPaperback
    Availability: In Stock

    Based on a 'national collection of the national instrument' now assembled in National Museums Scotland, this book offers an account of the musicology of the bagpipe in its European context, including the remarkable influence of the Baroque on Scotland's musical traditions. The record is meagre for the evolution of the bagpipe in Scotland and perceptions of the 'national instrument' have depended on a stereotype Great Highland Bagpipe assumed to have a continuous history from a distant past. The evidence, as far as it goes, suggests that Scotland adopted a 'great pipe' from the European bagpipe tradition and made it, through the strength of the Gaelic language and its music, very much its own. This edition does not have the accompanying CD-ROM of the first edition but is otherwise unaltered.

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    Based on a 'national collection of the national instrument' now assembled in National Museums Scotland, this book offers an account of the musicology of the bagpipe in its European context, including the remarkable influence of the Baroque on Scotland's musical traditions. The record is meagre for the evolution of the bagpipe in Scotland and perceptions of the 'national instrument' have depended on a stereotype Great Highland Bagpipe assumed to have a continuous history from a distant past. The evidence, as far as it goes, suggests that Scotland adopted a 'great pipe' from the European bagpipe tradition and made it, through the strength of the Gaelic language and its music, very much its own. This edition does not have the accompanying CD-ROM of the first edition but is otherwise unaltered.