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    Publisher: Vagabond Voices

    Human Rights in a Big Yellow Taxi

    £8.95
    ISBN: 9781908251176
    AuthorKerr Peter
    Pub Date16/09/2013
    BindingPaperback
    Pages136
    Availability: In Stock

    A twelve-year-old schoolchild was arrested at his school and questioned by an anti-terrorist police squad, because he was organising a picket of the offices of his member of parliament, who happened to be the current prime minister of Great Britain. He was protesting against the closure of a youth club. Starting with this absurd example of over-zealous anti-terrorist legislation, Kerr, who has a nose for both the absurd and the shocking, develops his concerning arguments about the gradual erosion of our human rights, particularly in Great Britain and the United States. He backs up his arguments with plenty of examples, including legislation introduced under the American presidents since Reagan, including Barack Obama. He also examines the various philosophical movements that have either enhanced or undermined human rights, and he never loses sight of the social and political forces in play. This is essential reading for anyone interested in these disturbing developments in the fundamental law of our countries.

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    A twelve-year-old schoolchild was arrested at his school and questioned by an anti-terrorist police squad, because he was organising a picket of the offices of his member of parliament, who happened to be the current prime minister of Great Britain. He was protesting against the closure of a youth club. Starting with this absurd example of over-zealous anti-terrorist legislation, Kerr, who has a nose for both the absurd and the shocking, develops his concerning arguments about the gradual erosion of our human rights, particularly in Great Britain and the United States. He backs up his arguments with plenty of examples, including legislation introduced under the American presidents since Reagan, including Barack Obama. He also examines the various philosophical movements that have either enhanced or undermined human rights, and he never loses sight of the social and political forces in play. This is essential reading for anyone interested in these disturbing developments in the fundamental law of our countries.