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    Insanitary City: Henry Littlejohn and the Condition of Edinburgh

    £24.99
    Dr Henry Littlejohn's Report on the Sanitary Condition of Edinburgh (1865) was a landmark in public health administration, with a significance far beyond the boundaries of Edinburgh. This book reproduces the complete, original Report, and describes fully its pivotal role in the development of public health management in Victorian cities.
    ISBN: 9781859362204
    AuthorPaul Laxton
    Pub Date30/01/2014
    BindingHardback
    Pages480
    Availability: In Stock

    Dr Henry Littlejohn's Report on the Sanitary Condition of Edinburgh (1865) was a landmark in urban management and public health administration. The Lancet described it as 'monumental'. The Report had a significance far beyond the boundaries of Edinburgh and his meticulous research produced penetrating insights into the links between poverty, employment and public health in Victorian cities. Insanitary City reproduces the full Report and sets it in this wider context. For over half a century, Littlejohn's career as Police Surgeon, Crown witness in murder cases and medical advisor to the Scottish Poor Law authorities, gave him an unrivalled overview of the problems confronting Victorian society. In 1895 he was knighted 'for services to sanitary science'.

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    Dr Henry Littlejohn's Report on the Sanitary Condition of Edinburgh (1865) was a landmark in urban management and public health administration. The Lancet described it as 'monumental'. The Report had a significance far beyond the boundaries of Edinburgh and his meticulous research produced penetrating insights into the links between poverty, employment and public health in Victorian cities. Insanitary City reproduces the full Report and sets it in this wider context. For over half a century, Littlejohn's career as Police Surgeon, Crown witness in murder cases and medical advisor to the Scottish Poor Law authorities, gave him an unrivalled overview of the problems confronting Victorian society. In 1895 he was knighted 'for services to sanitary science'.