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    Last White Man

    £12.99
    ISBN: 9780241566572
    AuthorMohsin Hamid
    Pub Date11/08/2022
    BindingHardback
    Pages240
    Availability: In Stock

    From the internationally bestselling author of Exit West, a story of love, loss, and rediscovery in a time of unsettling change

    One morning, Anders wakes to find that his skin has turned dark, his reflection a stranger to him. At first he tells only Oona, an old friend, newly a lover. Soon, reports of similar occurrences surface across the land. Some see in the transformations the long-dreaded overturning of an established order, to be resisted to a bitter end. In many, like Anders's father and Oona's mother, a sense of profound loss wars with profound love. As the bond between Anders and Oona deepens, change takes on a different shading: a chance to see one another, face to face, anew.

    'Gorgeously crafted . . . The Last White Man concludes on a note of hope, a door jarred open just enough to let transcendence pour through' O, the Oprah Magazine

    'The electric premise, borrowed from Kafka's The Metamorphosis, looks set to update a classic to make it urgently relevant' Evening Standard

    Praise for Exit West

    'Hamid's enticing strategy is to foreground the humanity. . . . [He] exploits fiction's capacity to elicit empathy and identification to imagine a better world.' - The New York Times Book Review

    'Lyrical and urgent . . . peels away the dross of bigotry to expose the beauty of our common humanity.' - O, the Oprah Magazine

    'Powerful, vivid, poignant . . . Hamid is the master' The Sunday Times

    'Astonishing' Zadie Smith

    '[An] exceptionally moving and powerful novel' The Guardian

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    From the internationally bestselling author of Exit West, a story of love, loss, and rediscovery in a time of unsettling change

    One morning, Anders wakes to find that his skin has turned dark, his reflection a stranger to him. At first he tells only Oona, an old friend, newly a lover. Soon, reports of similar occurrences surface across the land. Some see in the transformations the long-dreaded overturning of an established order, to be resisted to a bitter end. In many, like Anders's father and Oona's mother, a sense of profound loss wars with profound love. As the bond between Anders and Oona deepens, change takes on a different shading: a chance to see one another, face to face, anew.

    'Gorgeously crafted . . . The Last White Man concludes on a note of hope, a door jarred open just enough to let transcendence pour through' O, the Oprah Magazine

    'The electric premise, borrowed from Kafka's The Metamorphosis, looks set to update a classic to make it urgently relevant' Evening Standard

    Praise for Exit West

    'Hamid's enticing strategy is to foreground the humanity. . . . [He] exploits fiction's capacity to elicit empathy and identification to imagine a better world.' - The New York Times Book Review

    'Lyrical and urgent . . . peels away the dross of bigotry to expose the beauty of our common humanity.' - O, the Oprah Magazine

    'Powerful, vivid, poignant . . . Hamid is the master' The Sunday Times

    'Astonishing' Zadie Smith

    '[An] exceptionally moving and powerful novel' The Guardian

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