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    Not a Novel: Collected Writings and Reflections

    £14.99
    I first read German writer Jenny Erpenbeck on the recommendation of a colleague about five years ago. End of Days – her sixth novel – was enough to get me hooked and become a full-blown Erpenbeck evangelist. Since then, I’ve sought out her work which spans essays, novellas and novels. I’m yet to see one of the operas that she directs, but it’s important to have goals. Erpenbeck’s latest, Not a Novel is a collection of essays that spans 25 years of her writing life, and covers the personal as well as art and culture, criticism, politics and society. Erpenbeck is playful, insightful and curious, and writes with palpable empathy. These characteristics mean that I turn to her as a writer to help me understand the world we live in.
    ISBN: 9781783786091
    AuthorJenny Erpenbeck (Y)
    Pub Date05/11/2020
    BindingHardback
    Pages208
    Availability: Out of Stock

    Not a Novel gathers together the best of Jenny Erpenbeck's non-fiction. Drawing from her 25 years of thinking and writing, the book plots a journey through the works and subjects that have inspired and influenced her. Written with the same clarity and insight that characterize her fiction, the pieces range from literary criticism and reflections on Germany's history, to the autobiographical essays where Erpenbeck forgoes the literary cloak to write from a deeply personal perspective about life and politics, hope and despair, and the role of the writer in grappling with these forces.

    Here we see one of the most searching of European writers reckoning with her country's divided past in all its complexity, and responding to the world today with insight, intelligence and humanity.

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    Not a Novel gathers together the best of Jenny Erpenbeck's non-fiction. Drawing from her 25 years of thinking and writing, the book plots a journey through the works and subjects that have inspired and influenced her. Written with the same clarity and insight that characterize her fiction, the pieces range from literary criticism and reflections on Germany's history, to the autobiographical essays where Erpenbeck forgoes the literary cloak to write from a deeply personal perspective about life and politics, hope and despair, and the role of the writer in grappling with these forces.

    Here we see one of the most searching of European writers reckoning with her country's divided past in all its complexity, and responding to the world today with insight, intelligence and humanity.