Close
(0) items
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Browse
    Filters
    Preferences
    Search
    Publisher: Luath Press

    Red Sky at Night

    £9.99
    This work looks at the everyday life of John Barrington, a shepherd to over 750 Blackface ewes who graze near some of Britain's most beautiful hills overlooking Loch Katrine.
    ISBN: 9781908373373
    AuthorJohn Barrington
    Pub Date01/04/2013
    BindingPaperback
    Pages256
    Availability: In Stock

    John Barrington was a shepherd to over 750 Blackface ewes who graze 2,000 acres of some of Britain's most beautiful hills overlooking the deep dark water of Loch Katrine. The yearly round of lambing, dipping, shearing and the sales is marvelously interwoven into the story of the glen, of Rob Roy in whose house John lived, of curling when the ice is thick enough, and of sheep dog trials in the summer. Whether up on the hills or along the glen, John knows the haunts of the local wildlife: the wily hill fox, the grunting badger, the herds of red deer, and the shrews, voles and insects which scurry underfoot. He sets his seasonal clock by the passage of birds on the loch, and jealously guards over the golden eagle's eyrie in the hills. Paul Armstrong's sensitive illustrations are the perfect accompaniment to the evocative text.

    Write your own review
    • Only registered users can write reviews
    *
    *
    • Bad
    • Excellent
    *
    *
    *

    John Barrington was a shepherd to over 750 Blackface ewes who graze 2,000 acres of some of Britain's most beautiful hills overlooking the deep dark water of Loch Katrine. The yearly round of lambing, dipping, shearing and the sales is marvelously interwoven into the story of the glen, of Rob Roy in whose house John lived, of curling when the ice is thick enough, and of sheep dog trials in the summer. Whether up on the hills or along the glen, John knows the haunts of the local wildlife: the wily hill fox, the grunting badger, the herds of red deer, and the shrews, voles and insects which scurry underfoot. He sets his seasonal clock by the passage of birds on the loch, and jealously guards over the golden eagle's eyrie in the hills. Paul Armstrong's sensitive illustrations are the perfect accompaniment to the evocative text.