Close
(0) items
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Browse
    Filters
    Preferences
    Search

    Shuggie Bain

    £8.99
    Recommended by Genevieve Fay, our Communities Programme Officer:

    Having recently been shortlisted for the Booker Prize, it is no wonder that many people, including First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, are reaching for a copy of Shuggie Bain. Douglas Stuart has written this powerful debut novel drawing on his own life experiences.

    Set in 1980s Glasgow, which seems to be unravelling under the weight of its own identity crisis, families struggle with unemployment, crushing poverty, and the waves of addiction that are engulfing much of the city. It is a book of both sadness and beauty, a chronicle of memorable characters, their defiance and hope in the face of the grim realities of life and survival.

    ISBN: 9781529019292
    AuthorDouglas Stuart
    Pub Date15/04/2021
    Pages448
    *
    Availability: In Stock

    Winner of the Booker Prize 2020
    Shortlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction 2020
    A BBC Radio 2 Between the Covers 2021 Book Choice

    'We were bowled over by this first novel, which creates an amazingly intimate, compassionate, gripping portrait of addiction, courage and love.' The judges of the Booker Prize

    'Douglas Stuart has written a first novel of rare and lasting beauty.' - Observer

    It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest.

    Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother's sense of snobbish propriety. The miners' children pick on him and adults condemn him as no' right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place.

    Douglas Stuart's Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst's The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Edouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, a blistering debut by a brilliant writer with a powerful and important story to tell.

    *
    *
    *

    Winner of the Booker Prize 2020
    Shortlisted for the National Book Award for Fiction 2020
    A BBC Radio 2 Between the Covers 2021 Book Choice

    'We were bowled over by this first novel, which creates an amazingly intimate, compassionate, gripping portrait of addiction, courage and love.' The judges of the Booker Prize

    'Douglas Stuart has written a first novel of rare and lasting beauty.' - Observer

    It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest.

    Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother's sense of snobbish propriety. The miners' children pick on him and adults condemn him as no' right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place.

    Douglas Stuart's Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst's The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Edouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, a blistering debut by a brilliant writer with a powerful and important story to tell.

    Customers who bought this item also bought

    Scott-land: The Man Who Invented a Nation

    £12.99
    Stuart Kelly's biography of Sir Walter Scott defies classification in terms of genre. Rather than a literary biography, or critical study, it is a personal examination of the sometimes overwhelming affect Scott has had on Scottish identity at large, and on how his legacy affects the very act of writing in Scotland.

    Blood and Gold: A Journey of Shadows

    £12.99
    Blood and Gold is a powerful, dynamic fusion of African and Scottish myth and fantasy which explores the themes of racism, immigration and colonialism, and the acceptance of self, grief and loss.

    Mayflies

    £8.99
    From the widely renowned author Andrew O'Hagan, a heartbreaking novel of an extraordinary lifelong friendship.

    A Rising Man

    £8.99
    **SELECTED AS WATERSTONES' THRILLER OF THE MONTH 2017****WINNER OF THE CWA ENDEAVOUR HISTORICAL DAGGER 2017**** CHOSEN AS SUNDAY TIMES CRIME BOOK OF THE MONTH 2017****SHORTLISTED FOR THE THEAKSTONS OLD PECULIER CRIME NOVEL OF THE YEAR 2018**'An exceptional historical crime novel' C.J.

    Sir Walter Scott: A Life in Story

    £9.99
    Walter Scott's novels and poems reveal his view of history and the influences that made him, especially the stories of his native Borders and the exploits of his ancestors. Eileen Dunlop looks afresh at Scott the writer, and Scott the man.