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    Publisher: Sandstone Press

    The Art of Kozu

    £6.99
    The Takayanagi family of art dealers have long been associated with the artist Yuichiro Kozu (1878-1953). With the war over interest is renewed in the art of Yuichiro Kozu, but can the truth really be understood from a painting? Is direct observation and accuracy enough? Perhaps a story is also required.
    ISBN: 9781910124000
    AuthorJames Edgecombe
    Pub Date19/09/2014
    BindingPaperback
    Pages128
    Availability: In Stock

    The Takayanagi family of art dealers have long been associated with the artist Yuichiro Kozu (1878-1953). In Paris, the founder of the Midori Gallery knew him when he painted his tragic, married lover, Yumiko. Even more controversially, Kozu's painting in Indochina during the Japanese occupation 'looks past the cruelty - to see the horror'. He had no compunction in using people, whether servants or lovers, to set his scenes, no fear of dissection or execution. His paintings testify to a criminal indifference. With the war over interest is renewed in the art of Yuichiro Kozu, but can the truth really be understood from a painting? Is direct observation and accuracy enough? Perhaps a story is also required.

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    The Takayanagi family of art dealers have long been associated with the artist Yuichiro Kozu (1878-1953). In Paris, the founder of the Midori Gallery knew him when he painted his tragic, married lover, Yumiko. Even more controversially, Kozu's painting in Indochina during the Japanese occupation 'looks past the cruelty - to see the horror'. He had no compunction in using people, whether servants or lovers, to set his scenes, no fear of dissection or execution. His paintings testify to a criminal indifference. With the war over interest is renewed in the art of Yuichiro Kozu, but can the truth really be understood from a painting? Is direct observation and accuracy enough? Perhaps a story is also required.