Close
(0) items
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Browse
    Filters
    Preferences
    Search

    The Great Glen: From Columba to Telford

    £9.99
    All-encompassing history of Scotland's most famous glen from the times of St Columba to the period when Thomas Telford was Britain's most prominent civil engineer in the 1850s.
    ISBN: 9781906476663
    AuthorCatriona Fforde
    Pub Date02/11/2011
    BindingPaperback
    Pages240
    Availability: In Stock

    This book provides a picture of the Great Glen, stretching from Fort William to Inverness, from AD550 to 1850. It begins with a description of the glen as it is today and an account of its geological development. This is followed by eleven chapters describing major characters or events in the glen. These are: St. Columba, King Brude, Macbeth, Alasdair Carrach (an early chief of the Keppoch MacDonalds), the Battle of the Shirts, the 1st Marquis of Montrose, Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, Viscount (Bonnie) Dundee, the building of the Military Roads, the 1745 Jacobite Rising and its aftermath and the building of the Caledonian Canal. There is a short final chapter which makes some reference to the poets and musicians of the glen. Brief passages throughout on political and social developments serve to link the chapters together. The book is academic to some degree but perfectly comprehensible to the general reader with any interest in history. It will be particularly welcome to the hundreds of people who walk the Great Glen Way each year.

    Write your own review
    • Only registered users can write reviews
    *
    *
    • Bad
    • Excellent
    *
    *
    *

    This book provides a picture of the Great Glen, stretching from Fort William to Inverness, from AD550 to 1850. It begins with a description of the glen as it is today and an account of its geological development. This is followed by eleven chapters describing major characters or events in the glen. These are: St. Columba, King Brude, Macbeth, Alasdair Carrach (an early chief of the Keppoch MacDonalds), the Battle of the Shirts, the 1st Marquis of Montrose, Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, Viscount (Bonnie) Dundee, the building of the Military Roads, the 1745 Jacobite Rising and its aftermath and the building of the Caledonian Canal. There is a short final chapter which makes some reference to the poets and musicians of the glen. Brief passages throughout on political and social developments serve to link the chapters together. The book is academic to some degree but perfectly comprehensible to the general reader with any interest in history. It will be particularly welcome to the hundreds of people who walk the Great Glen Way each year.